Switch Off

I was busy reviewing a case when I noticed that my reading area had gotten dim. I thought either my eyes were getting tired, or there was someone hovering my area and covering the light. As it turns out, the fluorescent lamp nearest to me had just officially died, and unfortunately for me, the Maintenance Office claims to have no stored bulbs in its supplies. Tough luck. The light from my computer screen is not enough. This is torture for someone with poor eyesight and migraine. 

On a lighter note, I just asked an officemate, who is a mother, to serve as an ‘ilaw ng tahanan’. Corny,  but it made both of us laugh anyway. 
Obstacles. Minor compared to what most are experiencing. 
Like in most obstacles, I had two options. One, to dwell on this negativity, rant my head off, and succumb to whatever miserable state I was in. Or two, be more optimistic and claim that as soon as tomorrow (with fingers crossed), my ‘problem’ will have its solution. 
There’s an obvious right choice. However, sometimes the obvious right choice is difficult and challenging to do, so I tend to do the other. I rant. I complain. I explode. Sometimes it solves the problem. Most often, it does not. 
And that’s why I chose to do the right, more sensible thing. I feel good about it. 
Fast forward to a few hours later. Here I am, in the dark again, stuck in the most terrible traffic, faced with yet another obstacle. I am tired. I am hungry. I have food, but I don’t want to eat here. I want to be home with family. 
My driver, who’s probably already in his 70’s, seems more tired and much hungrier. He seems more anxious, too. 
We talk. I offered him candies and some takeout food, which he happily accepted. He now has a smile on his face, and so do I. 
One hour and thirty minutes (and counting) for what was supposed to be just a 20-minute ride home. Unless this car had long mechanical legs or wings, then I can’t do anything (rant, complain, blame myself for choosing the wrong day to run an errand), but wait and be patient. 
Patience. My thoughts run back and forth to the fluorescent lamp (or the lack thereof) at the office and the decision to eat some of the takeout food that I have. Just a bit more, we’re moving. Slowly, but moving anyway. 
I blink, and it’s not as dark anymore. 
I’m home. ❤️

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It’s a new day marked by the sun’s warm breeze

That slowly drifts in her room through the rainbow-tinted windows

She gently opens her eyes and quickly begins to have sweet fleeting thoughts of him

She wonders, also hopes and half-expects,

Do I have a message from him?

Knowing clearly well that a message meant he thought of her, too

And that he had greeted the day ahead with the same wish and hope that she had

She is not aware of it, but even before she had stood and gotten out bed

She had already decided on the kind of day she’ll have

Where a message meant the promise of the most wonderful day

And where none meant she’d rather not have stood and just slept the day away

This is how she lives

Day after day, after

Her happiness, her sadness, her life

All depending on the time and effort

He was willing to offer and give

So today, she reaches for her phone with great anticipation

Anxious and nervous

She reaches and struggles with her thumb

Unaware of the tragedy in her reality

How she relies on someone else for the inevitable

Happiness or sadness that’s yet to come.

Whut? Huh?

Someone I know got visibly annoyed when after she had shown me her pictures in the society page of a Sunday newspaper, I reacted less enthusiastic or impressed as she had expected.
This confuses me a bit. Isn’t “Wow! Cool.” coupled with a sincere smile a socially acceptable response? I was not being sarcastic, nor did I come off as such, but my reaction annoyed her anyway.
Had it been a work published or the paper featuring her for something remarkable she did, then I might have reacted differently, or maybe even envious. But we’re talking about her pictures at a party she attended. I understand it’s something to be excited about, and I would have felt just as excited if I saw my picture in a newspaper or magazine, too. But expect people, even those you are not close to, to react in a particular manner and feel disappointed or annoyed when they don’t, is a bit off, don’t you think?